Lack of project managers hits infrastructure plans

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A lack of project managers is set to send costs soaring and cause delays on major infrastructure projects.

 

A report by accountant EY is also warning that commercial and financial managers are in short supply.

 

“Combined with the geographic nature of infrastructure programmes, decision makers in most regions can’t assume the skills are there and need to think creatively and embrace better ways of working to ensure that they can deliver projects in a way that provides value for money”

The warning comes as another major report states that the industry must double its current output to £95,000 a minute for the next decade to deliver infrastructure plans.

Full text here:

http://www.constructionenquirer.com/2017/09/13/lack-of-project-managers-hits-infrastructure-plans/

Hackers send silent commands to speech recognition systems with ultrasound

Security researchers in China have invented a clever way of activating voice recognition systems without speaking a word. By using high frequencies inaudible to humans but which register on electronic microphones, they were able to issue commands to every major “intelligent assistant” that were silent to every listener but the target device.

The demodulated speech registered just fine, and worked on every major voice recognition platform:

DolphinAttack voice commands, though totally inaudible and therefore imperceptible to humans, can be received by the audio hardware of devices, and correctly understood by speech recognition systems. We validated DolphinAttack on major speech recognition systems, including Siri, Google Now, Samsung S Voice, Huawei HiVoice, Cortana, and Alexa.

Full article available here: https://techcrunch.com/2017/09/06/hackers-send-silent-commands-to-speech-recognition-systems-with-ultrasound/?ncid=rss

How Machine Learning Advances Will Improve the Fairness of Algorithms

 

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The good news is that we have many computer scientists who care deeply about the fairness of ML algorithms, and have developed methods to make them less biased than humans. A few years ago, a group of researchers at Microsoft Research and Boston University uncovered gender discrimination inherent in certain linguistic tools used in many search engines. When used to complete the analogy “man is to computer programmer as woman is to ___,” this tool produced the answer “homemaker.” Our team debiased this tool so that it delivered gender neutral results, making it less biased than humans.

There is an entirely new field emerging at the intersection of computer science, law, and ethics. It will not only lead to fairer algorithms, but also to algorithms which track accountability, and make clear which factors contributed to a decision. There’s much reason to be hopeful!

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/how-machine-learning-advances-will-improve-the-fairness_us_599d8de8e4b056057bddcfc3

IBM and cancer

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Breathlessly promoting its signature brand — Watson — IBM sought to capture the world’s imagination, and it quickly zeroed in on a high-profile target: cancer.

But three years after IBM began selling Watson to recommend the best cancer treatments to doctors around the world, a STAT investigation has found that the supercomputer isn’t living up to the lofty expectations IBM created for it. It is still struggling with the basic step of learning about different forms of cancer. Only a few dozen hospitals have adopted the system, which is a long way from IBM’s goal of establishing dominance in a multibillion-dollar market. And at foreign hospitals, physicians complained its advice is biased toward American patients and methods of care.

Full text here: https://www.statnews.com/2017/09/05/watson-ibm-cancer/